Moose Peterson

 

When did you know the photography/video industry was for you?

I still don’t know that! When in high school, photography became a way for me to tell stories so I started to carry a camera with me all the time. I still do that.

How did you get your current position?

Working very, very hard 24/7/365. It’s our own company so you’re on all the time to keep the ball moving forward.

How did your training or schooling prepare you for your job?

It really didn’t. There are little things every now and then I can attribute to school help but the majority of the lessons come from life.

What was the greatest obstacle you had to overcome in pursuing your career?

Having the capital to act on ideas

Who would you name as the most influential person in shaping your career?Why?

The folks who influenced me are the hundreds of biologists who shared their knowledge with me and gave us a home in their field research.

If you could be compensated for your work with something other than money, what would it be?
Time!

Jim DiVitale

 

When did you know the photography/video industry was for you?

In 11 grade I took my first photography class. Images from my first roll of fill were printed up and then entered into a student photo contest in West Palm Beach Florida.  6 months later, I received a letter from my Congressman telling me my photography was hanging in the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts.  That was it….. “Mom, can you buy me a camera, I want to be a professional photographer” From there it was a steady course of going from the High School yearbook photographer to a fine art Photography program at Palm Beach Community College, and then the Art Institute of Atlanta.

How did you get your current position?

After graduation in 1978, I went to work in an Atlanta advertising photography studio working in the darkroom. I then learned my craft of multi-image compositing and working with other photographers images until I was ready to start as a studio assistant, then staff photographer. Changed jobs to work in a large catalog production studio where I learned how to work as a team with art directors, stylists and clients. In 1885 I opened my first studio and have been shooting commercial advertising photography ever since along with teaching at the Art Institute of Atlanta and doing programs across the country for Canon USA  and Adobe.

How did your training or schooling prepare you for your job?

The training I got in school helped me develop the portfolio I needed to open the doors to get me in for the job interviews. The training I received on the job finished my photo education before I was ready for my own studio. You don’t want to be starting your own business without both the school background and on the job training.

What was the greatest obstacle you had to overcome in pursuing your career?

I always seemed to be in a rush to get to the next higher position in my career, but when I would get there I would then realize that the time I spent in the darkroom, sweeping floors, and then assassinating was very well spent..   I finally learned not to be in a hurry. My greatest obstacle was my own impatience. Take your time and learn your craft correctly.

Who would you name as the most influential person in shaping your career?Why?

My mentor in the world of photography was Dean Collins. I can state that Dean was the greatest teacher of lighting our industry has ever had and I was proud to be his friend. Long before I knew him personally and began teaching with him, I learned how to control and shape with light and these lesions will always hold true from working with film to the world of digital photography.

If you could be compensated for your work with something other than money, what would it be?

Having my fine art photography recognized in more museum and gallery showings is very fulfilling. Had a six month long one-man show in an Atlanta Art Museum in 2012 and really enjoyed the process of putting it together. Teaching photography is my second love. Getting ready to start a nationwide tour for Canon in 2014 and finding more opportunities to share the knowledge with upcoming students is all the compensation I need.

Dixie Dixon

 

When did you know the photography/video industry was for you? 

I would definitely have to say when my image made the cover of the yearbook in high school… I can remember the feeling that went along with that.  I was very shy growing up (still an introvert today) and so my camera served as my sidekick in exploring the world and a way to get outside of my comfort zone!  I’ve been in love ever since.. its been such an adventure!

How did you get your current position? 

I launched my business- Dixie Dixon Photography now Dixie Dixon Inc. while in college shooting everything ranging from portraits, events, products, and etc to pay the bills while building my commercial portfolio along the way.  Then I would only post my commercial work on my website which is how I eventually broke into the commercial photography industry and now I am shooting strictly that.  Its where my passion lives!

How did your training or schooling prepare you for your job? 

I actually have a degree in Business Entrepreneurship and I think that has definitely helped me keep it real on the business, marketing, and branding sides of my career.  And assisting other photographers in the industry really helped with the shooting side of things… I love to learn and try to soak up information like a sponge 😉

What was the greatest obstacle you had to overcome in pursuing your career? 

I think that balance has been a real struggle for me… there are so many hats a photographer has to wear in this business- from shooter to marketer, to the business person and figuring out where to spend ones time between all of those while also fitting a social life in between all of that has been tough for me.  I am a bit of a workaholic nature so I have to keep that in check!

Who would you name as the most influential person in shaping your career?  Why? 

Wow, thats a hard one!  I have had so many great mentors in my career… people who have made such an impact throughout my journey and I am so grateful for them.. ranging from photographers to business people to friends- All of who have shaped the way I see the world and business today.  But of course, my family has really been insanely influential in pushing me to create a career doing what I love… their positive influences and just kind support make a huge difference!

If you could be compensated for your work with something other than money, what would it be? 

For me (like many photographers), the money is just an added bonus.. because I love what I do so much that just the feeling of being able to make beautiful pictures and work with great people day-in-day-out is enough for me!  We are all in this crazy adventure of life together and its my hope that my images might brighten someone’s day or help someone see the world differently or just show that you really can do you what you love in this life!   

2018 Photo per day Project

Here is the challange:

One of the most amazing parts of photography is realizing how many photos can be taken from one spot. You can give a camera to 20 people in one room, ask then to shoot one photo and get 20 different images.

I challenge all of you to take one photo per day. It does not matter if you are a photographer, a mom, a dad, a student, a teacher, firefighter, lawyer, or a doctor; anyone can do it.
Use your cell phone, your point-and-shoot, or your pro camera. It can be out of the camera or edited. There are no rules.

I will post a weekly theme every Sunday night. You can follow it or not, take it literally or not. Just have fun! Shoot an image per day and post them, or post your favorite of the week.
Post your photo on your Facebook or Instagram account each day using the hashtag #photopaths2018
Each week I will pull the hashtag and post a slideshow with the images submitted.

I’ll start easy: This weeks theme: Jan 8-13th is “Circles” (again, attack it as you prefer…)

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